For her massive open online course in Useful Genetics, UBC’s Professor of Zoology, Dr. Rosie Redfield produced her own stop motion animation using candy to illustrate how haemophilus influenzae cells take up DNA. She regularly creates her own video resources to support her teaching and has put together a workable DIY media studio on her desktop.

This is just one example of how video, implemented in right circumstances, supports learning. For other examples, see below.

Evidence-based science education in action - video demonstrations. This collection of videos was inspired by the observation that instructors are most likely to consider trying new teaching strategies after watching a colleague or a video that demonstrates the strategy in action in a real setting. These are not documentaries or testimonials. They are demonstrations of students learning, and teaching strategies in action.

In this video interview, Dr. Claudia Krebs talks about the benefits of video to teach neuroanatomy labs. The video series and accompanying learning material can be viewed here.

For more examples of varied video projects in progress at UBC along with explanations of why and how they came to be, see the Inspirations section this site.

The Digital Tattoo Project team has developed a video series called Think Before You Ink (TBYI) to introduce students and provoke thinking around various themes related to online presence and digital reputation. Digital Tattoo on YouTube.

The UBC Learning Commons student team has created a series of video tutorials and video resources to support student learning and provide introductory how-to information about accessing the services of the Chapman Learning Commons.

Students in an introductory physics course with Dr. Simon Bates, produce learning resources to share with their peers. The creation process supports sense making and the building of connections - important to the learning process. Here's an example that one student prepared, using an analysis of a basic physics principle to prove that, in fact, astronauts really did travel to the moon.

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